NYT

The board of Yahoo, the faded Web pioneer, agreed on Sunday to buy the popular blogging service Tumblr for about $1.1 billion in cash.

Nice workin’ with ya, Tumblr.

So lately, my old friend Cassandra and I(MOOOOSTLY her, she’s been working hard) have been working on a podcast & news site called o.t.o. that focuses largely on Visual Kei and Japanese/east asian music in general.

This is the first episode in which I actually come on and talk. Cassandra plays the new Silver Ash stuff and I play Tokusatsu(the band) and Janne Da Arc and we also talk a bit about all those bands. It was fun, so CHECK IT OUT!!


(before any tokusatsu superfans chew me out for misinfo, I know they don’t have two songs about dogs and cats, I was thinking of the song アベルカイン.)

USA Today:

Jamie Sniffen, 39, held back a charging pitbull and watched as the two men fought, her boyfriend stabbing and pistol whipping her obese paramour, who came at him with a stereo speaker.

LOL 

http://en.rocketnews24.com/2013/01/28/japan-sets-guinness-record-for-synchronized-mascot-dancing-video/

It’s not surprising that in Japan, the land of cute and cuddly, pretty much everything has a fuzzy mascot. Even prefectural and city governments are getting in on the merchandising mania with adorable (or terrifying, depending on your point of view) characters called yuru-kyara meant to promote tourism and local products.

[…]This week, 141 yuru-kyara from 25 prefectures across the country gathered in Sasebo, Nagasaki Prefecture, to make their mark on history by becoming the largest group of mascots ever to do the same dance together.[…]

HTB, the event organizers, set the goal of gathering characters from all over the country to perform a synchronized dance number to a song called The Beard Dance by The Drifters (a Japanese comedy rock band with no relation to the American R&B group). If, during the 5-minute song, less that 5% of the characters were out of sync or made mistakes, they would get a listing in the Guinness Book of World Records.

Although the yuru-kyara earnestly and enthusiastically shook their tiny arms and bulbous bodies to the music, they twice failed meet the requirements. However, 134 mascots put in a flawless performance on the third try and succeeded in setting the record! Congratulatory music played and the characters jumped around hugging each other, completely lost in the moment.[…]

No Tabo-kun (T.M.R’s mascot to promote the Shiga prefecture).

It feels like it has pretty much become Kumamon all the time now. Not that I mind, though. [wsj blog] [official blog] [dancing to “chocolate disco”]
(It is also doing some PR with Scott Murphy and Rivers Cuomo for their Japanese album…)

L’Arc’s Ken also has his own mascot character named C.H.Lion Rag baby (“C.H.” for “curly hair”). It’s not a local tourism character, but it still attends some of the big yuru-chara gatherings.

This five-year-old boy in Alabama(?) got kidnapped. He’s stuck in a bunker with some nutty Vietnam vet. 

abc.go.com

Clouse said the boy has Asperger’s syndrome, an autism-like disorder, as well as ADHD. Police have been delivering medication to him through the pipe, he said.

I hope that medicine has Iocaine powder in it, and that they’re secretly building up the boy’s resistance, so when the man runs out of cans of beans and demands a pizza SWAT can POISON THE FUCK OUT OF IT

TOKYO —Parliament formally elected Shinzo Abe as prime minister on Wednesday, ending a three-year break from decades of near-constant rule by his conservative Liberal Democratic Party.

The victory puts Mr. Abe, 58, a former prime minister and outspoken nationalist, at Japan’s helm as it faces the growing burden of its aging population, years of industrial decline and the challenge of an increasingly assertive China. The change in prime ministers is the seventh in six years, a high turnover that is itself a sign of this nation’s inability to escape its long economic funk.

Second verse, same as the first…

The Atlantic:

A record-low 26% of Americans favor a legal ban on the possession of handguns in the United States other than by police and other authorized people.

When Gallup first asked Americans this question in 1959, 60% favored banning handguns. But since 1975, the majority of Americans have opposed such a measure, with opposition around 70% in recent years.

thx e!